Fig 1. Denise Poote (2018) Carcreeper, AR-activated drawing, graphite on paper. (Activated using Artivive phone app).

FINDING FORM – exploring expression in the encounter of an embodied drawing practice Denise Poote August 2019

Introduction

If you ask me to imagine taking a step forward, but not to take it and then push me forward, I will fall forward and take a step to break the forward movement. However, if you ask me again and push me backwards this time, my body resists – primed in tonicity and in my imagination towards an enacted event (Paxton in Stern, 2010, p133). Daniel Stern’s ‘forms of vitality affects’ (Stern, 2010) and practice-based reflective enquiry lie at the heart of this paper. It aims to reflect on the relationship around concepts of ‘affect’ and ‘expression’ in an aesthetic encounter: relating these to my practical processes and outcomes which lie in the middle ground between an engagement with an embodied drawing practice and an awareness of operating in a socially engaged world particular to Western industrialised countries.

Objective

The objective of this exploration is to better understand how the experience of drawing in an embodied practice may create a form of shared collective knowledge that encompasses those who encounter the process or artefacts made by the drawing practitioner.

I am interested in how Affect Theory may frame how we dynamically repeat and yet create difference. I intend to examine these frameworks for considering the primacy of possible relationships around art practice and its encounter.

I will test these affective frameworks by examining the work of artists Lygia Clark and Elizabeth Price. (NB. As a woman, the choice of studying only women practitioners is of interest to me but necessarily falls outside the scope of discussion in this essay).

I will use the methodology of micro-analytic interviews (MAI) (Stern, 2004) to attempt a phenomenological re-living of an extracted moment from a personal enactment of Clark’s Caminhando (1963) and from the events of an recalled moment from a year-old, past encounter with Price’s The Woolworth Choir of 1979 (2012). This choice of methodology draws on its psychological analytic aims and also on Schön’s reflection-in-practice/on-practice where a dynamic experimentation is undertaken to allow findings to lead new thought and hypothesis creation (Schön, 1983, p147).

Lygia Clark, who practised through to 1988, was associated with the Neo-Concretism movement from 1970s that espoused sensual participatory experiences, offering work to be shared with the audience in a gallery setting. I have chosen to enact Caminhando, from her mid-career work as it is particularly resonant with my enquiry here. It is a phenomenological event that does not exist before or afterward and is initiated by the instructions of the artist for those involved in the encounter with the work.

Alongside this case, I will examine the work of Elizabeth Price, a contemporary artist practitioner and curator whose Turner prize winning film installation, The Woolworth Choir of 1979, I find particularly engaging and sensorially affective in its rhythmic, visual poetry and precarious weaving of narrative, images and text. I have chosen to draw on a personal encounter with this work one year ago as evidence for discussion and a testing ground for MAI.

Using these artist practices as case studies, I will consider questions around the role of affect in embodied strategies used by practitioners to make and present experiential work in a gallery setting.

I will consider these questions with reference to critical theory including Affect Theory, models of expression (considering time-space and the virtual). I will use affective language relating to terminology of drawing (describing mark, tone, composition, gesture) to keep close to the core of my enquiry regarding the investigation of a purpose of drawing as an embodied practice.

Why this is relevant to my practice now

My practice (in the expanded field of drawing) is triggered in response to an intuitive felt sense of opportunity. I find or create a framework to work within and respond to dynamics of time, space, materials and fate within those boundaries.

As Jane Grisewood describes of her practice:

‘The condition of ‘seeing’ is not a prerequisite – drawing exists with and without seeing. It resides in a gap between, where time itself unfolds and things are generated and shared, liminal and open- ended’ (Grisewood, 2010, p50).

Once a phase of work has ended within a given framework, that work can continue to shift in its form, encounter, reproduction, entering a different phase triggered by new potential/possibilities that are again in response to an intuitive felt sense of opportunity. The value of the artefact sits in a continuum of creative process and is often not showing evidence of a design or purpose.

If an audience are part of this creative process, they are in some way a material, as am I, the artist/maker. In this role, I present the processual artefacts with a preferred narrative, in the knowledge that this is a subjective presentation. My preference is to offer the work for change once I have designed a systematic framework of making or ended the phase of making (that is embodied practice, led by intuitive elements etc.). The residual artefacts are presented for an encounter that may be affective in that the artefacts themselves work as ‘body-to-body’ rather than as an expression of the artist: able to rest unchanged/end/restart, dynamic in where the expression resides (Lygia Clark , 1963a, p160). An example of such work is a drawing that activates an AR experience or sculptural forms that can be shifted and reworked.

Through research, I became concerned with spatial and temporal practices that I identified with the notion of an ‘aura’ in relation to an embodied drawing practice. I found this most closely described as the ‘bodymind’ suggested by Phillip Zarilli (Zarilli, 2012). By this I mean making work with a sense of myself and an awareness of the context in which I am making the work – the physicality of the space and the knowledge that what I make would be a residue of the experience.

I suggest that this practice of making generative opportunities, triggered by process, site and materials, belongs to an expanded field of drawing. For example, I recently presented a series of ‘drawings’ in the form of movable green wooden structures alongside digital photographs on wood panels of those same structures in a cave setting. Thereby inviting the structures to be experienced in multiple different configurations that could shift and change both physically and conceptually.

Fig 2a and 2b Denise Poote (2019) To You, To Me (Squeezeboxes), wood, acrylic paint (Installation view and film stills from live art performance by Jasmine Aldridge at Lewisham Art House January 2019).

Questioning Walter Benjamin’s notion of aura within a framework of immanence where all is found from within (whatever this ‘within’ may be), Marius Von Brasch draws on Jacques Deleuze’s notion of ‘The Fold’ and ‘Becoming’ with a view to opening a place for questions about the encounter with aura in a creative process (Von Brasch, 2012, p20). In its relationship to ‘Becoming’, in the middle of the folding of the virtual/real and the ‘events’ which ‘emerge like dice-throws from virtual intensities’, Von Brasch concludes:

‘Aura concerns then less as ‘illusion’ than as qualitative and powerful incisions of internal time (duration) in a line of time that seems straight but effectively becomes labyrinthine with the challenge that any moment with its futurity holds for the process of subjectivation and emergence – also in art practice’ (Von Brasch, 2012, p20).

This co-incidence of my intuitive notion of aura and Von Brasch’s framing in Deleuzian intensities is pertinent here through a discussion of affect theory and expression within a ‘time-space’ that is dynamic and non-dualistic, to arrive at a position on practice that embraces its precarious and fugitive nature and a methodological framework to carry forward.

By specifically considering the relationship around audience and artist choices of methodology and formal representation, I can consider better how the experience of an embodied drawing practice may be shared as a form of collective knowledge.

This collective knowledge is difficult to isolate and define. It is in flux, dynamic and shifts across relationships of being, objects, time and space. It is related to embodiment (Varela, 1991), (Merleau-Ponty, 2012); to language and affect (Massumi, 1995), (Deleuze, 1994); and seen as evident in recent arisings of political grassroots activism (Solnit, 2019). It is not communication nor illustration, and not therapeutic nor meditative. Rather, it is draws on Heidegger’s notion of the way in which the world ‘worlds’ (Murphie, 2010), (Heidegger, 1962) and, in creative practice, on how ‘the artist dissolves in the world’ (Clark, 1965).

Overview of essay structure

To introduce a theoretical context for this reflective enquiry, I will examine definitions of affect with specific reference to vitality affects (Stern, 2010) in order to set up a means of talking about the underpinnings of my propositions on relationship around the encounter with work, its maker and the audience/beholder/participant.

I will then briefly consider how these affects are available across form and time-space, without location in being and objects, through Deleuze and Massumi’s theories of the Virtual and the Fold with reference to critical models questioning the nature and methods of knowledge via Sedgwick.

Enacting Lygia Clark’s work Caminhando which deals with performative-like artwork and re-visiting Elizabeth Price’s The Woolworth Choir of 1979 film installation, I will analyse how these works operate in terms of expression and affect.

In summary, I would like to bring my own practice to light and propose a new theoretical understanding of the expression of drawing in the expanded field and its encounter as generative of shared collective knowledge through a process of continual negotiation and spatial and temporal becoming.

Affect and why it is useful for this discussion of shared collective knowledge and embodied strategies of drawing

I want to talk about the concept of affect as a mechanism to find a dynamic interpretative mode to discuss how shared collective knowledge and embodied strategies of drawing may exist within a common framework with some potential positioning of art practice in the world as part of a communal, social encounter.

Theories around affect and its relation to emotion and feeling are numerous and divided. 1 Categorical affects according to Silvan Tomkins identify nine classes physiologically belonging to human biology and are ‘engines of motivation’ (Tomkins, 1962). These include affects called joy, surprise, fear, shame, anger and are measured using scales of intensity or density of neural firing. More useful for our discussion here will be non-categorical affects that sit closer to the in-between state referenced by the affect theory of Brian Massumi (2015) and the vitality forms of Daniel Stern (2010).

Stern’s vitality affects allow the conjunction of both feeling and movement. According to Susan Best,

‘for Stern, vitality affects are non-categorical affects; they form the unnoticed background pattern of life. The elusive qualities of these feelings are best captured, he says, by dynamic, kinetic terms, such as surging, fading away, fleeting, explosive and decrescendo. After Susanne Langer, he suggests vitality affects are forms of feelings intimately connected to the vital processes of life: breathing, sleeping, waking etc.’ (Best, 2014, p58).

For Massumi, affects are useful ‘as a way of talking about that margin of manoeuvrability, the ‘where we might be able to go and what we might be able to do’ in every present situation’ (Massumi, 2015, p3). Drawing on Spinoza’s idea that form is felt regardless of its reality, he cites the menace of Saddam Hussein for the US during the 2000s as a threat of an impending reality in the present – so affective as an actual reality – not actually real but felt into being (Massumi, 2010, p54).

Affect is a tricky, hard-to-articulate concept. It is resistant to definition – Marcel Duchamp referred to the ‘infra-thin’ when trying to express affective states, such as the warmth of a seat that has just been vacated 2, highlighting the quality of its changed state that cannot be reduced to the sum of its parts. In The Transmission of Affect (2004), Teresa Brennan notes the disjunction between our flesh, the subjective experiences of it and the subsequent attempt to bring this forth into a language that is slippery and affective itself (Brennan, 2004, p136). This problem with language is discussed by Sedgwick (2004) who highlight how feelings are ignored or subjugated as pious, naïve and inferior in some strand of theoretical writing, in what Paul Ricouer terms ‘the hermeneutics of suspicion’ (Ricoeur in Sedgwick, 2003, p124). Found for example in writings on the ideas of Marx, Nietzsche and Freud, this critique attempts to bring forth gaps and omissions in certain styles of theoretical writing, highlighting what they fail to know and cannot represent. Sedgwick proposes an alternative ‘reparative criticism’ that addresses texts as changing and heterogeneous relational stances (Sedgwick, 2003, p128) in order to address the function of knowledge and engage with Brennan’s approach ‘as a project to explore promising tools and techniques for non-dualistic thought and pedagogy’ (Sedgwick, 2003, p1). This usefully suggests that the non-location of artist/artwork/audience-spectator-beholder-participant is framed in a language that entwines a practical physiology and an abstracted philosophy, evading capture in the same sense as Sontag’s ‘fugitive sensibilities’ (Sontag, 1964).

1 See: Susan Best (2014) for this analysis.

2 Duchamp, 2008, p21

The physiological framework of Brennan’s approach enables discussion of shared collective knowledge and its dynamic shifting state by describing the whole body to be part of cognition. Other considerations of memory and emotional feeling states further complicate this physiological dynamic identified by somatic markers as ‘body loops’ (Bechara and Damasio, 2004). Such somatic markers lie outside of this discussion but contextualise the phenomenon of imagined movement I gave in the introduction with Massumi’s autonomy of affect: ‘affect is the emergence of actual relations on the one hand, and their falling back into virtual relations (relational potential) on the other’ (Murphie, 2010).

‘Affects are virtual synesthetic perspectives anchored in (functionally limited by) the actually existing, particular things that embody them. The autonomy of affect is its participation in the virtual. Its autonomy is its openness. Affect is autonomous to the degree to which it escapes confinement in the particular body whose vitality, or potential for interaction, it is… Actually existing, structured things live in and through that which escapes them. Their autonomy is the autonomy of affect’ (Massumi, 1995, p35)

In Deleuzian folding, even perception is an aftereffect of affect as ‘nothing authorises to conclude in favour of the presence of a body that might be ours, or the existence of the body that would have happened to affect it. There exists only what is perceived’ (Deleuze, 1993, p94). ‘To stick a pin into our hand and move it about, the pain would not be that of ‘a pin’ but of a sharpness intercepting our flesh’ that Deleuze claims ‘evokes a vibration gathered by a receptive organ’ (Deleuze, 1993, p95).’

Murphie suggests that ‘there is no pure or origin state for affect. Affect arises in the midst of in- betweenness: in the capacities to act and be acted upon’ (Murphie, 2010), citing Seigworth and Gregg:

‘affect is found in those intensities that pass body to body (human, non-human, part-body and otherwise), in those resonances that circulate about, between and sometimes stick to bodies and worlds, and in the very passages or variations between these intensities and resonances themselves’ (Seigworth and Gregg, 2010, p1).

Edward Casey’s notion of affect is useful here in placing expression away from residing in artist feelings. For Casey (1971), affect is the felt dimension of art where the expressive property of an art object is not a conveyance of expression but resides of the object. Casey’s expression consists of the affective qualities that account for cohesiveness of expression and continuity between subject and object, how it is perceived and its content and context of its reception. (Casey in Best, 2014, p84). Best cites two works by Eva Hesse and describes the affective tone of one piece, Tori (1969) as coherent, identifiable and consistent with the formal properties of the work and its meaning. For Best, both Tori and a second work, Repetition 19 III (1968), are moving, but in the case of the latter, more effort is needed to determine why and in what way – the work is indicative of non-categorical affect. Like the mechanisms of why an artwork’s composition might work, this destabilising uncategorizable affective dimension intrigues us and forms a connection that is dynamic and shifting in the particularities of the time and space encounter.

Why focus on vitality affects?

Stern’s Forms of Vitality Affect are the focus of this paper’s experimental test ground as they address how emotions are an equation of force and temporal shape as a specific emotion and pan-modal phenomenon that is embodied (Stern, 2010). Vitality forms refer to expression and perception in terms that cancel body processes and reflect an internal narrative that can be applied to objects, time, space. It is in relation to the intensities of Deleuze’s Virtual that Massumi’s potentials of Affect provide a reflective method that is used here as an analysis tool for case studies later. Stern is also clear that such methods of analysis might unpick a work but not guarantee that it survives the scrutiny and encompasses Sedgwick’s provocation for a reparatory critique by iterative and lateral interrogation that may produce new knowledge.

By using a practice-based, use-case example to evidence an affective experience, discussion on form and expression and the relationship to time and space in the encounter may be more closely examined. It offers a methodology to interrogate artists work as a phenomenologically aspired analysis, drawing on the affective properties of the encounter to provide a basis for discussing a way of moving forward with a framework for the relationship around an embodied drawing practice and the nature of its form in an encounter.

The dynamics of the In-between/time-space and expression

I would like to now consider how this dynamic, phenomenological in-between may be explored through concepts found in ideas of arising and enacting in terms of where the form of expression may exist and what this form may be pinned upon. Movement is a key term here, touching on dynamic shifts that are beyond presence/absence and Merleau-Ponty’s magnetised experience intertwining the body and the world which eludes spatial and temporal fixing.

In my practice, Lygia Clark’s ‘artist dissolved in the world’ acknowledges the possibility of collectiveness (Clark, 1998). Clark considered that the body, whether an object or person, is the space for primary experience and that the encounter is an expression of a ‘body-to-body’ (Clark 1963), serving to resist a fixing of location on body and its processes.

Merleau-Ponty regarded expression as a spectacle, drawing on Husserl’s overlaying, but with the added primordial spatiality of flesh (for example, the hand or a glove in relation to what it expresses). He describes this primordial spatiality as ‘a blind adherence to the world’ which is consistent with one’s ideal self-image and leads to ‘giddiness’ as we are aware of an underlying contingency (Merleau-Ponty, 2005, p296). Best accounts for this expression as an attribute of art considered as a phenomenon that consists of three aspects to the aesthetics of a work: affect, perceptual concerns and meaning; thus building on Edward de Duve’s observation of temporal order in the case of minimalism as a problematic factor in that ‘the immediate being-there’, the idea of the shape and actual exploration of the encounter are out of sync (Best, 2014, p23). This implies that the spectator must produce the conditions of experience already completed (dependent on the experience) as becomes apparent in the methodological constraints of the case study findings explored below.

Enacting Caminhando to explore expression

Doreen Massey describes the ‘throwntogetherness’ of place and ‘the unavoidable challenge of negotiating a here-and-now (itself drawing on a history and a geography of thens and theres); and a negotiation which must take place within and between both human and nonhuman’ (Massey, 2005, p151). I draw on this when addressing Clark’s Caminhando and Price’s The Woolworth Choir of 1979 through personal experience of the works as experimental samples to test my question of how an embodied drawing practice may share a collective knowledge with its audience.

Using Stern’s description of the micro-analytic interview (MAI) (Stern 2004) to achieve a closer documentation of phenomenal experience to relive the events of enacting and encountering the selected artist works, this method of documentation requires an in-depth, non-leading enquiry about affective qualities of a short encounter (like walking to the fridge to take out milk for a morning coffee). Stern comments that results are less coherent than memory but revealing of less apparent traits of user experience evoked through verbal/non-verbal primers in multiple ways than using other paths of memory recall like simple reconstruction. (Stern, 2004, p133). By interrogating an event in a non-linear, non-chronological, lateral method, I re-prioritised affects and other physiological/neurological, spatial concerns over memory and so encounter the critique in the spirit of Sedgwick’s ‘reparatory’ critique.

A personal account of affective evidence in Lygia Clark’s work Caminhando.

Clark clearly states that Caminhando is a work without a past/future and no artefact remains (Clark, 1963), so I document this work in this way as part of this research-based practice, not as part of the enactment of the work in an attempt to draw on phenomenological aspects of relived moments of consciousness that are intensely and iteratively analysed.

Fig 3 Lygia Clark (1963) Instructions for enacting Caminhando from Lygia Clark, “Walking Along: Do- it-Yourself”, instructions printed in Signals 1 (7) 1965, p. 7. Courtesy of The World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association.

Fig 4 Denise Poote enacting Caminhando 13 July 2019 (Documentary detail photograph).

Appendix 1 documents the stages of my encounter with the work and findings using MAI in handwritten notes and graphical representational drawing, alongside audio and video documentation of the experiment.

I identified three episodes of consciousness within my 18-minute enactment and focussed my analytic enquiry around Episode 3, a tentative moment in the last seconds of the duration when the intensity of affect, thoughts, images, posture and gesture were most clearly conscious with a beginning and end that shifted both in action and experience.

Fig 5 MAI graph of Lygia Clark work encounter identified as Episodes 1, 2 and 3.

The diagrammatic drawings are dynamic indications through line of illustrations of intensity of expression through affect, gesture, posture, thought, image/fantasy, isolated, revisited, adjusted and annotated, shifting and sometimes contradictory in articulation.

The combination of Clark’s intention to make work for others to enact and the method of Stern’s MAI provide both reflection-in-action evidence and further questions around the possibilities of sharing collective knowledge, memory, artefacts and representation, the event. I feel and share Clark’s intention that the cut paper artefact has no meaning or value and my memory of the experience is now fixed to the catharsis of the documentation of the experience rather than to the moment of creating/enacting the work, a duration that shifts in and out of consciousness and intuitive, physical and psychological presence. By presence, I wish to embody a sense of Massumi’s ‘in the middle’: a reference to the virtual – not location, not participation, no distinction between being or object: ‘You have to place yourself not in a position but in the middle, in a fairly indeterminate, fairly vague situation, where things meet at the edges and pass into each other’ (Massumi, 2015, p9).

Fig 6 Denise Poote (2019), Blindings-Movemes, canvas, acrylic paint, gel medium (Installation view at C4RD alongside Hannah Gormley work on wall in the background).

Clark states she is not interested in interacting with her own work but in seeing others do so (Clark 1960). This clearly differs to my own concerns. As a maker, I ‘do’, what I compare to a performative utterance (Austin, 1978), searching for a non-dualistic framework to allow an intuitive, embodied practice to temporally exist within its fluxing edges. This endeavour is literalised in recent practice shown as Blindings (2019), a series of sculptural forms whose edges are mapped arbitrarily as containers for an intuitive handmade mark. These containers can then exist for encounter with others, in space or new form, in a spirit familiar to Clark’s discussion for her earlier hinged sculptural forms, Bichos (1962). With the later work Caminhando, Clark distinguishes a fusing of subject and object where the idea is the artist’s and the expression is the viewer’s (which she subsequently dissolved further in her late career work that explored therapeutic methodologies in the Structuring the Body (1976–1988) series). This idea of an immanence, when carried without expression, Clark called the ‘empty-full’ of potential (Clark, 1963), ‘the basis for the precariousness that determines the eternal through every act’. This suggests a spirituality included in the notion of ‘participating in the very immanence of the creative act’ (Clark, 1963) so that ‘then for the first time, anyone is fit for the act of creating’ (Clark, 1960). The empty-full extends beyond artmaking along with its dynamic, unfixing location of the affective in-between. It is also possible to slip into the world, where art practice and social concerns overlap, as Rebecca Solnit recently wrote of the recent arising of global political protest as an activation of a collective imagination manifest through the literalising of common concerns that lay undisturbed rather than newly formed (Solnit, 2019).

A comparative account of MAI evidence in Elizabeth Price’s The Woolworth Choir of 1979 (2012)

Using a similar MAI methodology to test qualities of encounter and expression in order to compare with Clark’s Caminhando enactment, in order to evaluate overlaps, contrasts, incompatible variants and similarities, I will now briefly consider Elizabeth Price’s The Woolworth Choir of 1979, a work whose encounter affects me deeply and yet, different in form to Clark, exists in time and space as a filmic object installed in a designed gallery setting.

Fig 7 Elizabeth Price (2016) The Woolworth Choir of 1979 (Installation view at Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead)

I have experienced this work numerous times: at the Tate Britain as part of Turner Prize 2012 show and 12 months ago last year at Tate Britain again in a small side room where I was surprised and glad to find it and watched it a further five times. The compulsion to encounter it belongs to its rhythm and lyrical, visual poetry that is viscerally affective and emotional, provoking my imagination and physical response to make me more than a viewer/beholder. The narrative is on the edge of coherence in traditional storytelling despite its title and elements of its core material belonging to facts, diagrams and documentary footage of a real fire in history. I know ‘WE KNOW’ as the film’s increasingly insistent text frame provokes throughout, but what is the articulation of this knowledge and how does it find its form?

Fig 8 Film still from The Woolworth Choir of 1979 © Elizabeth Price, courtesy MOT International, London.

This work explores this notion of ‘WE KNOW’, weaving threads of narratives that are subtly, laterally knitted at points by a twisting gesture of the hand – sometimes still, sometimes articulating through movement. A soundtrack of startling clicks, snaps and couplets of song make me jump inside, alert to the frames and the collage and the montage, the composition Price dynamically chooses on her digital timeline. It’s got a fixed duration, a framework within which this shifting takes place. Price often continues to change the work after it’s been shown (Blanchflower, 2013). It’s restless and unresolved, coherent with its form and content.

Price specifically designs her films to situate a narrative in a location, so constructs a framework using diagram, animation, graphic narrative elements and archive images with the aim of communicating an imagined location in the mind of the viewer (Price, 2014). This assertion of narrative prescribing the elements that construct the work’s unfolding is common to Clark’s instructional brief for Caminhando and equates to the framework I find in my embodied practices. However, Price specifically controls our movements in that space – the whole experience of the work directs to church-like seating and darkened space. She choreographs the unfolding of the collaged elements in what Merleau-Ponty describes as a ‘strange adhesion of the seer and the visible’ intertwining of body and world 3 by including affective elements through loud, sudden edits and sound that startle us to reset our perceptions and lead us forward through the work. This controlled embedded intertwining led to problematic elements applying the MAI method as I was unable to access all parts of the work and was outside of its environmental concerns that will ‘furnish the experience’ (British Council, 2014). However, for the purposes of comparison and control, I will apply the MAI method, drawing on my most recent experience of encountering the work but note the relative distance in time and space, since the experience as an inequitable value in the reliability of the account.

3 Merleau-Ponty, 1968, p138

Appendix 2 details one episode that I identified undertaking a similar systematic working of Stern’s MAI procedure to that used for Caminhando above.

With the distance in historical time of 12-months, this example proved difficult to reliably document as a relived present moment. As a technique that supports the idea of a ‘polyphonic, polytemporal present moment that changes dynamically as it unfolds’ (Stern, 2014, p238), I found that my conscious episode became a representation of a layered experience of many encounters with the work. While trying to be present, I became aware that I presented a hybrid of felt memory and imagination, filled with associations from other parts of the work.

Fig 9 Elizabeth Price (2012) The Woolworth Choir of 1979 (still from an installation view of the work)

Once again, the diagrammatic drawings are dynamic indications through line of illustrations of intensity of expression through affect, gesture, posture, thought, image/fantasy, isolated, revisited, adjusted and annotated, shifting and sometimes contradictory in articulation and relate to a fragment of the memory where the blueprints of the fatal fire zone are shown with minimal sound at the end of the film.

Fig 10 MAI graph of Elizabeth Price work encounter identified as Episode 2

Findings

The choreography of the work, explicitly prescribed by Price, recalled William Kentridge’s story of the magician who revealed a trick’s workings whilst maintaining the awe of the audience in the encounter, ‘The pleasure in the moment of us believing and not believing at the same time is a jolt of self-assertion’ (Kentridge, 2014, p16). Lygia Clark’s work is choreographed in a similar endeavour of control but the breadth of affective possibility is less guided compared to Price’s work. By the ‘empty-full’ of her invitation to enact the work, a present moment that is fully available for a multiplicity of affective state changes is enabled. Once made, the work is part of the world and can disappear, change, be encountered. It is this part of the process, the participation/encounter/audience/narrative, that I argue is where the shared collective knowledge may exist, seen through a multiplicity of affective state changes that manifest in the body and imagination, in space and time.

Price included Caminhando in her curation of the 2016 exhibition In a Dream You Saw a Way to Survive and You Were Full of Joy at Hayward Gallery, London. I chose these case studies before I knew of this – I was drawn to both works without consciousness. It is not a co-incidence. There is a commonality of weaving, poetic, in-betweenness that is evidenced in the precarious functionality of Clark and Price’s frameworks with noted variance in the value of the artefact and control of form.

Both share a literalised aspect of practice – narrative hooks that allow the dynamic, affective pan- modal experiences to become. Expression then begins and shifts across thresholds of time and space, subject and object, intensity and force, that references the in-between where new knowledge is generated.

In this paper, we have examined theories of how an encounter may be part of a dynamic, shifting field of affective forces and tested works by Lygia Clark and Elizabeth Price using phenomenological aspects of reliving an encounter. Notions of precariousness in Clark’s work and literalising elements

of structure to a differing degree are apparent in each artist’s methods. Clark’s idea of the precarious originates as a rejection of traditions of representation while Price’s use of design and narrative weaves lateral, innate connections with embedded affective triggers to create cohesive fields of experience. Each work offers an encounter that leans towards a potential form of shared collective knowledge.

It is useful to consider how these works function in this way to consider where expression resides in an encounter that seeks to share a form of knowledge in relation to my embodied drawing practice. The question of where the primacy of that knowledge might lie in relation to elements of the persistence of the artefact, intersubjectivity and how new technology might approach these concerns remained outside the scope of this paper but would offer a rich seam of further enquiry.

©Denise Poote 2019.

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Sullivan, G. (2005). Art practice as research: inquiry in the visual arts. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
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Walker Art Gallery (2019). Artist Talk: Elizabeth Price and Lucy Raven with Pavel Pyś. [Internet]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wbcx6AXiO0&list=PLMmXBhwel_oVnRbbcpEqQifcL295bLql 9. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Zarrilli, P. (2012). ‘‘…presence…’ as a question and emergent possibility: a case study from the performer’s perspective’. In: Giannachi, G., Kaye, N. & Shanks, M. (eds) (2012). Archaeologies of Presence. Oxford: Routledge. [Internet]. Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central. (Accessed 14 October 2018).
IMAGES
Appendix 1 and 2 images – Poote, D. (2019). Denise Poote portfolio/working notes. [Internet]. Available from https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 1 – Poote, D. (2018). Carcreeper. [Internet]. Available from: http://denisepoote.com/portfolio/carcreeper-2018-at-wimbledon-reception-space-april-2018/. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 2a and 2b – Poote, D. (2019). To You, To Me (Squeezeboxes). [Internet]. Available from: http://denisepoote.com/portfolio/to-you-to-me-squeezeboxes-and-performance/. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 3 – The World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association, (nda). Lygia Clark, “Walking Along: Do-it- Yourself”, instructions printed in Signals 1 (7) 1965, p. 7. Courtesy of The World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association. [Internet]. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0740770X.2013.825444. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 4 – Poote, D. (2019). Denise Poote enacting Caminhando 13 July 2019. [Internet]. Available from https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 5 – Poote, D. (2019). MAI graph of Lygia Clark work encounter identified as Episodes 1, 2 and 3. [Internet]. Available from https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 6 – Poote, D. (2019). Blindings-Movemes. [Internet]. Available from: http://denisepoote.com/portfolio/blindings-movemes/. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 7 – MOT International. (nda). Elizabeth Price: The Woolworths Choir of 1979, 2012, HD video, 18:00 min installation view, Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead. [Internet]. Available from: https://circaartmagazine.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/EP_Baltic_16-300×200.jpg. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 8 – MOT International. (nda). Film still from The Woolworth Choir of 1979 © Elizabeth Price, courtesy MOT International, London. [Internet]. Available from: https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/images/ic/976x549_b/p012dcm7.jpg. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 9 – Price, E. (2012). The Woolworth Choir of 1979 (still from an installation view of the work). [Internet]. Available from: https://e3.365dm.com/16/07/1600×900/153141496- 2_3687162.jpg?bypass-service-worker&20160706132132. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 10 – Poote, D. (2019). MAI graph of Elizabeth Price work encounter identified as Episode 2. [Internet]. Available from: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Robinson, H. (2006). Reading Art, Reading Irigaray. London: IB Tauris.
Schön, D. A. (1983). The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. [Internet].Available from: https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ual/reader.action?docID=4816972&ppg=1. (Accessed 16July 2019).
Sedgwick, E. K. (2003). Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity. US: Duke University.
Seigworth & Gregg. (2010). ‘An Inventory of Shimmers’. In: Seigworth & Gregg. (2010). TheAffect Theory Reader. Durham: Duke University Press.
Solnit, R. (2019). People Power. [Internet]. Available from:https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jun/01/rebecca-solnit-protest-politics-world-peterloo-massacre. (Accessed 30 June 2019).
Sontag, S. (1964). Notes on “Camp”. [Internet]. Available from:https://monoskop.org/images/5/59/Sontag_Susan_1964._Notes_on_Camp.pdf. (Accessed 23 July2019).
Stern, D. N. (2004). The Present Moment in Psychotherapy and Everyday Life. New York: Norton.
Stern, D. N. (2010). Forms of Vitality: Exploring Dynamic Experience in Psychology, the Arts, Psychotherapy, and Development. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Sullivan, G. (2005). Art practice as research: inquiry in the visual arts. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
Tate.org. (nda). Elizabeth Price The Woolworths Choir of 1979. [Internet]. Available from:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srhcNFMbSk0,. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Tomkins, S. (1962). ‘What are affects?’ In: Sedgwick, E. K., Frank, A., & Alexander, I. E. (1995). Shame and its sisters: a Silvan Tomkins reader. Durham: Duke University Press.
Varela, F. J., Thompson, E., & Rosch, E. (1991). The embodied mind: cognitive science and humanexperience. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.
Von Brasch, M. (2012). Distance, however near it may be’: Revisiting ‘Aura’ on the Axis betweenPainting and Digital Technology within a Deleuzian Framework of ‘Becoming’. [Internet]. Available from: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/346350/1/Final%2520PhD%2520thesis%2520-%2520Marius%2520Von%2520Brasch.pdf. (Accessed 30 June 2019.
Walker Art Gallery (2019). Artist Talk: Elizabeth Price and Lucy Raven with Pavel Pyś. [Internet].Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wbcx6AXiO0&list=PLMmXBhwel_oVnRbbcpEqQifcL295bLql9. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Zarrilli, P. (2012). ‘‘…presence…’ as a question and emergent possibility: a case study from theperformer’s perspective’. In: Giannachi, G., Kaye, N. & Shanks, M. (eds) (2012). Archaeologies of Presence. Oxford: Routledge. [Internet]. Available from: ProQuest Ebook Central. (Accessed 14 October 2018).
IMAGES
Appendix 1 and 2 images – Poote, D. (2019). Denise Poote portfolio/working notes. [Internet]. Available from https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T.(Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 1 – Poote, D. (2018). Carcreeper. [Internet]. Available from:http://denisepoote.com/portfolio/carcreeper-2018-at-wimbledon-reception-space-april-2018/.(Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 2a and 2b – Poote, D. (2019). To You, To Me (Squeezeboxes). [Internet]. Available from:http://denisepoote.com/portfolio/to-you-to-me-squeezeboxes-and-performance/. (Accessed 23July 2019).
Fig 3 – The World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association, (nda). Lygia Clark, “Walking Along: Do-it-Yourself”, instructions printed in Signals 1 (7) 1965, p. 7. Courtesy of The World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association. [Internet]. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0740770X.2013.825444. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 4 – Poote, D. (2019). Denise Poote enacting Caminhando 13 July 2019. [Internet]. Availablefrom https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14July 2019).
Fig 5 – Poote, D. (2019). MAI graph of Lygia Clark work encounter identified as Episodes 1, 2 and 3.[Internet]. Available from https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 6 – Poote, D. (2019). Blindings-Movemes. [Internet]. Available from:http://denisepoote.com/portfolio/blindings-movemes/. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 7 – MOT International. (nda). Elizabeth Price: The Woolworths Choir of 1979, 2012, HD video, 18:00 min installation view, Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead. [Internet]. Available from: https://circaartmagazine.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/EP_Baltic_16-300×200.jpg. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 8 – MOT International. (nda). Film still from The Woolworth Choir of 1979 © Elizabeth Price,courtesy MOT International, London. [Internet]. Available from:https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/images/ic/976x549_b/p012dcm7.jpg. (Accessed 23 July 2019).
Fig 9 – Price, E. (2012). The Woolworth Choir of 1979 (still from an installation view of the work).[Internet]. Available from: https://e3.365dm.com/16/07/1600×900/153141496-2_3687162.jpg?bypass-service-worker&20160706132132. (Accessed 14 July 2019).
Fig 10 – Poote, D. (2019). MAI graph of Elizabeth Price work encounter identified as Episode 2.[Internet]. Available from: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T. (Accessed 14 July2019).

Appendix 1

MAI working notes and documentation relating to a personal encounter that enacted Lygia Clark’s

Caminhando.

Date of Micro Analytic Interviewing Saturday 13 July 2019 Audio descriptions and video files available at:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T Images of method and working notes from Caminhando enactment:

Appendix 2

MAI working notes and documentation relating to a reflection on a past encounter which took place at Tate Britain, July 2018 with Elizabeth Price’s The Woolworth Choir of 1979.

Date of Micro Analytic Interviewing Saturday 13 July 2019 Audio descriptions and video files available at:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1EQlhnrb5pltHT8FW6aeEF04SRDwUPb7T Images of method and working notes from reflection using MAI: